Category Archives: 愛國百人一首

愛國百人一首ゑはがき:大中臣輔親

yama-no-goto

山のごと坂田の稲を抜き積みて君が千歳の初穂にぞ舂く
yama no goto sakata no ine wo nuki tsumite kimi ga chitose no hatsuho ni zo tsuku
like mountains we have piled the year’s first harvest: rice for pounding and observing the thousand years of your imperial reign

Ōnakatomi no Sukechika (大中臣輔親, 954-1038) was a Heian Period Shinto priest and poet.

松本盛昌, 愛國百人一首ゑはがき
東京:愛國社、昭和18年 (1943)。
Postcard, illustrated by Matsumoto Morimasa

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under 愛國百人一首

愛國百人一首ゑはがき:平野国臣

aogumo

青雲のむかふす極すめらぎの御稜威かがやく御代になしてむ
aogumo no mukafusu kiwami sumeragi no miitsu kagayaku miyo ni nashiten
on the far horizon blue clouds expand: so may the brightness of his majesty’s reign extend forever

Hirano Kuniomi (平野国臣, 1828-1864) was a warrior from southern Japan involved in several coup attempts during the Bakumatsu; a proponent of the Sonnō jōi exclusionist platform, he was executed at 36. Two personal poetry anthologies of his work survive: Hirano Kuniomi Kashū (平野国臣歌集) and Reigo Shōkō (囹圄消光), a compilation of poetry written while he awaited execution.

松本盛昌, 愛國百人一首ゑはがき
東京:愛國社、昭和18年 (1943)。
Postcard, illustrated by Matsumoto Morimasa

Leave a comment

Filed under 愛國百人一首

愛國百人一首ゑはがき:賀茂真淵

kamo_no_mabuchi

大御田のみなわも泥もかきたれてとるや早苗は我が君の為
omita no minawa mo hiji mo kakitarete toru ya sanae wa waga kimi no tame
planting rice seedlings in a muddy paddy amid the pouring rain: even these tasks done for the Emperor’s sake

Kamo no Mabuchi (賀茂真淵, 1697-1769) was a major Edo Period philologist and a central figure in the Kokugaku school of national studies. Kamo was a student of Kada no Azumamaro, and his own most famous student was Motoori Norinaga.

松本盛昌, 愛國百人一首ゑはがき
東京:愛國社、昭和18年 (1943)。
Postcard, illustrated by Matsumoto Morimasa

Leave a comment

Filed under 愛國百人一首

愛國百人一首ゑはがき:津守国貴

kimi-wo-inoru

君をいのるみちにいそげば神垣にはや時つげて鶏も鳴くなり
kimi wo inoru michi ni isogeba kamigaki ni haya toki tsugete tori mo nakunari
having risen early to pray for his majesty I hear the cock crow passing on my way as the shrine gate rises

The postcard’s subject is standing next to the statue of Ōmura Masujirō (大村 益次郎, 1824-1869) at Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo. Ōmura is regarded as the father of the modern Japanese military, and his statue was one of the first in a western style to be erected in Japan.

松本盛昌, 愛國百人一首ゑはがき
東京:愛國社、昭和18年 (1943)。
Postcard, illustrated by Matsumoto Morimasa

Leave a comment

Filed under 愛國百人一首

愛國百人一首ゑはがき:森迫親正

inochi_yori

いのちより名こそ惜しけれもののふの道にかふべき道しなければ
inochi yori na koso oshikere mononofu no michi ni kaubeki michi shinakereba
more precious than life is an unsullied name for the warrior who would undertake the way that must be trod

Poem by Morisako Shinnō (森迫親正, 1535-1551), a Sengoku Period warrior who died at 17. The Aikokusha postcard is an historical depiction of the author, but another contemporary postcard offers an illustration of a nocturnal military mission in winter:

morisako

Leave a comment

Filed under 愛國百人一首

愛國百人一首ゑはがき:加納諸平

kimi ga tame.jpg

君がため花と散りにしますらをに見せばやと思ふ御代の春かな
kimi ga tame hana to chirinishi masurao ni misebaya to omou miyo no haru kana
in this spring of your reign I think I see in the cherry blossoms that fall so swiftly the stalwart warriors eager to give their lives for you

Poem by Kanō Morohira (1806-1857), an Edo period nationalist scholar born in Tōtōmi Province (now Shizuoka Prefecture). Before inclusion in the 1943 Aikoku Hyakunin Isshu, this poem was part of Kanō’s 1854 anthology Songs from the Persimmon Garden (柿園詠草, Kakizono Eisō). Emiko Ohnuki-Tierney discusses the identification of falling cherry blossoms with the sacrifices of Japanese soldiers at length in her Kamikaze, Cherry Blossoms, and Nationalisms: The Militarization of Aesthetics in Japanese History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002), but especially at pp. 74-75.

The postcard’s subject is standing in front of a shrine that resembles the Imperial Shrine of Yasukuni, established in 1869 to honor the spirits of persons who died in the service of the Empire of Japan.

松本盛昌, 愛國百人一首ゑはがき
東京:愛國社、昭和18年 (1943)。
Postcard, illustrated by Matsumoto Morimasa

Leave a comment

Filed under 愛國百人一首

大木合名会社謹製「愛国百人一首」

karuta

Leave a comment

September 22, 2015 · 4:49 pm